unified graphics controller

XCOMPUTE’s graphics architecture is built on OpenGL 3.3 with some basic GLSL shaders. The focus has always been on efficiency and usefulness with large engineering data sets – it is meant to visualize systems.

However, along the way we recognized that we could unify all graphics objects (technically, vertex array objects) in our render pipeline as to not only handle 3d objects, topologies, and point clouds, but provide a powerful framework for in-scene widgets and helpers. We’ve barely started on that:

A basic in-scene color bar utilizes multiple graphics components: Text is rendered with glyph texture atlases, the color legend uses a similar texture technique but with PNG infrastructure. The pane itself is also a graphics object, each with unique definition and functions but unified stylistic and graphics controls. Note, that behind the color bar is the simulation and its meta-regions are also graphics objects with similar capabilities and controls.

As we’re getting ready to launch the product, I’m connecting modules that perhaps didn’t have priority in the past. The other night, I spent a few hours looking at what easy things we could do with a unified “appearance” widget, built in the client with Qt in about 130 lines:

XCOMPUTE’s Appearance Widget allows users to customize color, transparency, textures, and render modes. Style control flags are updated instantly, not requiring any data synchronization!

I then imported a complex bracket geometry and applied a wood PNG texture with RGBA channels projected in the Z-direction:

Triply-periodic bracket structure (held on left, loaded on right) imported as STL and meshed in XCOMPUTE with 440K cells in about 10 minutes. Shown is a highly-computable finite element mesh based on Per-Olof’s Perrson’s thesis.

This looks pretty good for rasterization (60fps @ 1440×2560), but it isn’t perfect….there are a few artifacts and shadowing is simplified. I think the space between the wood slats is really cool and makes me want to grab this thing and pull it apart. Those gaps are simply from the alpha-channel of the PNG image…just for fun. We’ll expose more bells and whistles eventually.

Soon, I’ll show the next step of analyzing such a component including semi-realistic displacement animations.

In the future (as we mature our signed distance infrastructure), we make look at ray-tracing techniques, but for now the focus is on efficiency for practical engineering analyses.


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